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Easter Carrot Cake with a Twist

Carrot Cheesecake with Nuts The earliest known carrot cake recipe didn't appear until 1862. However, carrots have been used since the medieval era to sweeten foods when other sweeteners, like sugar, were scarce. Though clearly, modern adaptations of carrot...

Carrot Cheesecake with Nuts
Carrot Cheesecake with Nuts

The earliest known carrot cake recipe didn't appear until 1862. However, carrots have been used since the medieval era to sweeten foods when other sweeteners, like sugar, were scarce. Though clearly, modern adaptations of carrot cake use a fair amount of sugar as well. The popularity of carrot cake in the U.S. may be a result of an excess of canned carrots during World War II, when master bakers were employed by business man George C. Page to find ways to utilize the carrots.

Today carrot cakes are a favorite treat for spring, and perhaps because of the association between carrots and rabbits, and additionally rabbits and the Easter bunny, carrot cakes seem a perfect choice to serve at Easter celebrations. Being somewhat of a staple nowadays, you likely have acquired carrot cake recipes from a family member, or even created your own.

So, rather than giving you the same old recipe, here are instructions for carrot cake layered with cheesecake. This combination may sound too good to be true, but the creaminess of the cheesecake perfectly compliments the course crumb of the carrot cake.

So, without further ado, here's what you'll need to create this decadent marriage of desserts.

Carrot Cake with Cheesecake

Carrot Cheesecake
Carrot Cheesecake

Ingredients:

Cake:

  • 1 cup white sugar
  • 1 cup brown sugar
  • 1-1/2 cups vegetable oil
  • 3 large eggs
  • 2 cups flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon cloves
  • 2 teaspoons cinnamon
  • 3 cups finely shredded carrots

For the cheesecake:

  • 16 oz cream cheese
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice

Cream cheese frosting (can be left out, since you already have cheesecake):

  • 1 stick of butter (1/2 cup)
  • 1/2 cup cream cheese
  • 2 cups confectioner's sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Directions:

  1. In a large bowl, mix all the dry cake ingredients. Set aside.
  2. In a separate bowl, mix all wet cake ingredients, sans the carrots.
  3. Fold the dry ingredients into the wet ingredients and mix thoroughly.
  4. Stir in the shredded carrots and set aside.
  5. For the cheese cake, beat cream cheese in a medium bowl or in a stand mixer.
  6. Add remaining ingredients to the cheese cake bowl and beat until fluffy. Set aside.
  7. Preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit.
  8. In a large rectangular baking dish, grease the bottom and add half of the carrot cake batter.
  9. With a large spoon, dollop half of the cheesecake mixture on top of the cake batter, but do not mix.
  10. Now add the remaining cake batter on top of that, and finish it all by spreading the last of the cheesecake mixture over the cake batter.
  11. Bake for 1 hour. Allow to cool for 20 minutes.
  12. In a large bowl for the cream cheese frosting, beat butter and cream cheese with an electric mixer at high speed.
  13. Add confectioner's sugar, one-half a cup at a time, and beat until fluffy.
  14. Add the vanilla and mix just a bit more. If you wish, you can chill this frosting in the fridge prior to use. Otherwise, spread it atop the cooled cake.

Carrot Cheesecake - Add your own glaze
Carrot Cheesecake - Add your own glaze

Alternatively, you can top your cake with one of the following:

  • Lemon glaze - this easy glaze is made with just lemon juice and confectioner's sugar. For the cake above, you should use approximately 1-1/2 cups of confectioner's sugar and 1/2 cup of lemon juice, though more or less juice can be used depending on how thin you like your glaze.
  • Kirsch glaze - this is quite similar in ratio to the glaze above, but instead of lemon juice, kirsch, which is a fruit brandy, is used. This glaze is often used on carrot cakes in Europe, and Germany in particular.

Have a recipe you'd like to share? Please, contact us, we'd love to hear from you.